BRAIN WORKS | ALL LATEST REVIEWS UPDATES OF LATEST SERIES |

BRAIN WORKS

HERE ARE THE LATEST REVIEW UPDATES OF THE SERIES CALLED BRAIN WORKS

Given how fascinating and intricate the human brain is, you would assume that viewing a television programme about intricate crimes using neuroscience would be an incredible experience. Unfortunately, Brain Cooperation, or Brain Works, is not that programme. 

Instead, you get a male protagonist who ardently aspires to be a cross between Sherlock and House but is unaware that the asshole genius cliché was only mildly amusing ten years ago, as well as a glacial plotline rife with simple plot devices.

The performance begins with a rock singer passing away in the middle of a song, while his distressed wife leans over him and admits to being the murderer. The case is just the most recent in a lengthy string of “brain-related” homicides within the jurisdiction of the recently established Neuroscientific Investigations Team, which is having structural and personnel issues. 

Detective Geum Myung-se (Cha Tae-hyun) is aware of a man who can assist them: Dr. Shin Ha-ru (Jung Yong-hwa), a renowned neuroscientist who is also a conceited wild card who breaks the rules.

It’s surprising how quickly Brain Works starts to lose steam, especially given how captivating the first fifteen minutes of the presentation are. In spite of its marketing, there isn’t much comedy or investigative elements in the first two episodes that have been released. 

The show splits its characters based on the alleged “brains” they possess, ignoring the reality that no two people are alike and that brains are complicated organs. This leaves the characters with an excruciatingly small amount of room to operate outside of these silos.

Seol So-jung (Kwak Sun-young), the captain of the investigative team, for instance, may be perceptive and a competent thinker, but because of her “anxious brain” moniker, she is limited to speaking in small bursts and serves mostly as the team’s spokesperson. The drama’s redeeming grace is veteran actor Cha Tae-hyun’s depiction of the hilariously pitiful Geum Myung-se.

 Cha is a natural because of his years of acting and variety show expertise; he glides with ease and seamlessly fits in with his co-stars. His acting skills aren’t enough, though, to make Jung Yong-hwa’s Dr. Shin Ha-ru seem less awkward. Their interactions and the difference between their personalities are amusing nonetheless.

The drama’s redeeming grace is veteran actor Cha Tae-hyun’s depiction of the hilariously pitiful Geum Myung-se. Cha is a natural because of his years of acting and variety show expertise; he glides with ease and seamlessly fits in with his co-stars. 

His acting skills aren’t enough, though, to make Jung Yong-hwa’s Dr. Shin Ha-ru seem less awkward. Their interactions and the difference between their personalities are amusing nonetheless.

Jung gives his character’s conceit and overconfidence too much weight. It’s more annoying than charming, especially considering the weak evidence supporting his alleged genius news articles, character rumours about him, and an odd, House-like scene in which he surmises that a potential suspect suffers from Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

But one can’t hold the action solely responsible. There are a lot of uncomfortable dialogues, filler scenes, and, most importantly, repetitive tropes in the show’s current script. For instance, Shin Ha-ru’s actions are mostly justified because, as is to be expected, he experienced childhood trauma that affected his memory. 

Surprisingly little attention to detail is also shown in a show that bases a large portion of its story on the medical field. For instance, Shin gets a severe headache while performing an autopsy and immediately takes a pill while still wearing gloves covered in cadaver brain fluid.

The pacing of Brain Works is also rough. It’s challenging to understand the characters or even the goal of the show because of the drawn-out discussions on ideas and the narrative’s rapid switching between cases and storylines. 

It’s a show that, at best, pretends to be smarter than it actually is. You’ll use a lot of brain cells trying to make sense of Brain Works until the cases demonstrate that the human brain is far more complex than simple labels. Brain Works is definitely aiming for a buddy-cop comic vibe.

Brain Works is available for streaming on Viu in select regions and airs on KBS2 every Monday and Tuesday.

Here are the detailed review updates on, Brain Works season 1. Follow Premiere next website for more details. 

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